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Columbus, Ohio
USA

Blog

Why injury? It's this simple: more children die from injuries every year than from the next three leading causes of death combined. Nobody knows this because no one is talking about it. In the U.S., one child dies every hour from an injury that could have been prevented. Around the world, a child dies every 30 seconds as the result of an injury. You don’t need to have a child to know that we can do better.

 

One Seat = One Rider

End Injury

sheep-farm-photo.jpg

It’s fall, and when I was a kid, fall meant rides in the combine as my dad, grandpa, or uncle would make the rounds on our 800 acres of corn and soybeans. My siblings and I (sometimes all four of us!) would climb up the combine’s little ladder and wedge ourselves into any place we could, often enduring really uncomfortable positions to ride along with Dad. I moved to a city for college and never left, but the farm girl in me never left, either. 

So naturally my parents were disappointed when my first child was at the age when my father wanted to take him on the tractor and I said no. Why am I so worried, they asked, when everyone in the neighborhood did it all the time?  

I’ve seen the news stories about kids who fall off of riding lawnmowers and get run over. I’ve seen stories of kids falling out of combines and getting caught in the harvesting equipment. Why take unnecessary risks when my kids are just as happy helping feed the sheep and water the horses?  

Farm safety is a big deal, and lessons (like staying away from the grain bin and gravity wagons) are taught as soon as kids can walk. In spite of this, every farm kid knows at least one person who was seriously hurt or who died due to a farm accident. I’d like to change that for my own kids, starting with the rule that one seat equals one rider on all equipment. My dad might be disappointed, but finding new traditions means my kids’ time on the family farm will stay fun and safe for everyone.

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