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Columbus, Ohio
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Filtering by Category: every year

Make safety a habit all year long

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Little steps can add up to big impact. Taking a few minutes every week to think about safety is a habit worth creating.

 

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Make your kid shine

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More kids are hit by cars on Halloween than any other day of the year, so make them shine! Add glow-in-the-dark or reflective tape (often found in the bicycle aisle or hardware section) to your kids' costumes so that drivers can see your little witches,  goblins, and vampires. Glow necklaces and flashlights are also good choices to help your kids stand out at night.

More information about Halloween safety here.

 

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Complete a backyard safety checklist

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As you and your family start spending more time outside of the house, make sure outside is as safe as possible with this sheet. Are your garbage cans securely covered? Do your light bulbs outdoors need changing?


Your children can – and probably should – help out with some of the items on the list. They may be able to tell you what parts of their swing sets need to be touched up, and you can tell them to clear their toys out of the walkways.

 

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Organize a safe family bike ride

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When was the last time you checked that your family’s bicycle helmets fit, or that all the bike tires were inflated to the right pressure? Children like to outgrow things during the winter, and air is notorious for escaping from tires. Plan a fun ride, and ask your children to help make sure everything still checks out before you go. Are the brakes still braking? Is the seat high enough? Use this quick guide to properly fit a helmet, and always follow manufacturers’ guidelines on correct tire pressure.

 

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Look cool mowing – get some fashionable safety glasses

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This time of year, you and your older children may be going to war with your yard. Do you have the right armor? Hundreds of children have eye and face injuries every year while mowing. Experts say that anyone using a lawn mower, child or adult, needs to wear polycarbonate protective glasses. They’re don’t all look like the chunky goggles from shop class – some look pretty sleek. Your children may even want to wear them.

If your children are helping with mowing, remember that a child needs to be at least 12 years old before operating any kind of mower, and must be 16 years old before using a riding mower. Along with eye protection, anyone mowing needs to wear hearing protection and sturdy shoes instead of sandals or flip-flops.

 

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Share injury information at your child’s school

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You may know that many serious childhood injuries can be prevented. But do other parents? Do the leaders at your child’s school? Help them learn by posting information about child injury on the school’s Facebook page, or emailing the principal a link to an injury fact sheet, or including an article in the school’s newsletter.

A good place to look for that information is Prevent Child Injury. The group of injury experts has pre-written Facebook posts, newsletter articles and other materials that are ready to share. Check out this info on keeping your children safe around medicine, for example.

 

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Set a reminder on your phone to replace your smoke alarm batteries.

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Smoke alarm batteries need to be replaced every year. For most people, it’s not very easy to remember birthdays from one year to the next, much less the exact date to change smoke alarm batteries. Use the calendar on your smartphone to set a reminder for yourself.

Smoke alarms themselves need to be replaced every 10 years – if you can’t think of the last time you bought new alarms, maybe it’s time to do that now. Visit the National Fire Protection Association website to learn more about maintaining your smoke alarms.

 

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Complete a cold weather vehicle checklist

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The holiday travel season is coming. This tip sheet and checklist will help you see if you’re ready.  Do you have an ice scraper in your car? Blankets in case you get stranded? Are your tires at the correct pressure?

Winter weather can bring dangerous driving conditions, but many people don’t think about that until it’s too late. Prepare now to help make your travels a little safer. 

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Check your winter sports equipment

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Before the snow starts falling and the kids pull out the sled, make sure everything is in good working order. Do the ski bindings need to be adjusted? Does the snowboarding helmet still fit? Have your kids outgrown their skates?

To get started, check out ways to properly fit all kinds of winter sports helmets here. And this article from KidsHealth.org lets you choose your winter sport and learn safe ways to participate in it. 

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Change your smoke detector batteries when you change your clocks

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Daylight savings time ends on Nov. 2. For years, fire safety experts have used the slogan “change your clocks, change your batteries” as a handy way to remember to keep your smoke detectors in good shape.

The National Fire Protection Association has found that 60%, or 3 out of 5, deaths from household fires happen in homes where there are no working smoke detectors. 

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