contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.


Columbus, Ohio
USA

More Actions

Filtering by Category: in cold weather

Make safety a habit all year long

End Injury

Little steps can add up to big impact. Taking a few minutes every week to think about safety is a habit worth creating.

 

More Actions

Protect little hands: put up a safety gate around fireplaces and stoves

End Injury

Your fireplace or wood stove may have doors or glass to keep children from reaching the flames, but that does not mean that they're safe from burns. The glass can reach temperatures has high as 1000 degrees, so protect little hands by putting up a safety gate around fireplaces and stoves. 

From the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's On Safety blog:

"If you already have a fireplace, buy a protective retrofit barrier to protect your little ones from being burned. Barriers can include attachable safety screens, safety gates and fireplace safety screens....  If you choose an attachable safety screen, check with your fireplace manufacturer to get the right one for your fireplace. You can buy safety screen barriers at fireplace retailers and hardware stores and purchase safety gates at big box and/or baby product stores."

More information here and here.

 

More Actions

Take off your child's coat BEFORE buckling them into a car safety seat.

End Injury

coats-safety-seats-action-photo.png

Cold weather has set in across the country, which means coats and snowsuits for everyone. All that extra padding, though, makes your child's car seat a little less effective, so take off your child's coat before buckling him up.

(Wondering why this matters or whether your child will be cold? Start with this story from today.com.)

 

More Actions

Be a cool parent: don’t leave the kids in the car

End Injury

You stop at the store for a quick trip inside, and the question pops into your head: “Should I take the kids in or just leave them out here in the car?”

As this video demonstrates, it doesn’t take long for your car to heat up like an oven, even on colder or cloudy days. And kids are more sensitive to heat because their skin is thinner than ours, so they start getting sick from the heat much faster than adults.

Yes, it will take some extra time, but be a cool parent and take the kids with you, even if it’s just a quick trip inside.

 

More Actions

Play home designer: move your furniture away from your windows

End Injury

Have you always meant to give the rooms in your home a fresh look? Well, there’s a serious reason to move your furniture around -- about 14 children per day go to a hospital emergency department after falling out of a window. Many of those children are able to reach windows by climbing on furniture.

The weather is warming up, and folks are starting to air out their homes after the long winter. So this is a great time to reorganize your rooms. Get your children in on the action, too. Talk to them about why you're moving the furniture, and see if they have any ideas about how to rearrange it. 

More Actions

Complete a cold weather vehicle checklist

End Injury

The holiday travel season is coming. This tip sheet and checklist will help you see if you’re ready.  Do you have an ice scraper in your car? Blankets in case you get stranded? Are your tires at the correct pressure?

Winter weather can bring dangerous driving conditions, but many people don’t think about that until it’s too late. Prepare now to help make your travels a little safer. 

winter-car-checklist-action-photo.png
 

More Actions

Check your winter sports equipment

End Injury

Before the snow starts falling and the kids pull out the sled, make sure everything is in good working order. Do the ski bindings need to be adjusted? Does the snowboarding helmet still fit? Have your kids outgrown their skates?

To get started, check out ways to properly fit all kinds of winter sports helmets here. And this article from KidsHealth.org lets you choose your winter sport and learn safe ways to participate in it. 

winter-sports-equipment-action-photo.png