contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.


Columbus, Ohio
USA

More Actions

Filtering by Category: in warm weather

Make safety a habit all year long

End Injury

Little steps can add up to big impact. Taking a few minutes every week to think about safety is a habit worth creating.

 

More Actions

Mark a 3-foot “No Kids Zone” around your grill

End Injury

Despite constant reminders to slow down, kids will always be running across the deck or patio to the backyard to play. A trip and fall around a hot grill could mean major burns for your little one, so take a few minutes to mark a 3-foot "No Kids Zone" around your grill with tape, paint, or chalk. Ask everyone to help enforce the 3-foot rule to keep kids (and pets) safe around the grill.

See an example of a "No Kids Zone" here. More grill and cooking fire tips here.

 
no-kids-grill-action-photo-.png
 

More Actions

Don’t sweat it. Drink plenty of water when out in the heat.

End Injury

It might seem simple, but getting enough to drink can make a huge difference in the health of your child, especially in the long, hot days of summer. Drinking plenty of water helps prevent muscle cramps, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke. Also, kids can’t handle heat as well as adults can, so it’s really important that kids drink water before, during, and after sports and recreational play. Click here for a handy infographic from Safe Kids Worldwide showing you how much your child should be drinking.

dont-sweat-water-action-photo.png
 

More Actions

Secure your perimeter: store Tiki torch fuel up and away

End Injury

A summer party isn’t complete without Tiki torches and other fun lights, but have you looked at the torch fuel? It looks just like apple juice.

How is your child going to know that one is okay to drink and the other is a deadly poison? Short answer: he won’t know, and there are plenty of stories that prove it. So after filling those torches, make sure you store the fuel up and out of sight.

lamp-fuel-action-photo.png
 

More Actions

Be a cool parent: don’t leave the kids in the car

End Injury

You stop at the store for a quick trip inside, and the question pops into your head: “Should I take the kids in or just leave them out here in the car?”

As this video demonstrates, it doesn’t take long for your car to heat up like an oven, even on colder or cloudy days. And kids are more sensitive to heat because their skin is thinner than ours, so they start getting sick from the heat much faster than adults.

Yes, it will take some extra time, but be a cool parent and take the kids with you, even if it’s just a quick trip inside.

 

More Actions

Water your lawn: empty your portable pool after every use

End Injury

OK, OK, maybe this isn’t the best way to water your lawn, but that kiddie or portable pool you have set up in the yard for the kids to splash in becomes a major drowning hazard if it’s still full of water after play time is over. It might be a pain to refill it every time the kids want to cool off, but it’s much, much safer. So water your lawn (or pour the water right into the storm drain) and empty kiddie and portable pools every time.

More advice for staying safe around portable pools can be found here.

 

More Actions

Jump with joy! Stay safe in inflatable bouncers

End Injury

Your child may be tugging at your hand, pulling you towards the bounce house at your local festival or fair or even in your neighbor's back yard, but do a little safety check before taking off her shoes and letting her bounce to her heart's delight:

Only let your child jump alone or with children of her own size and age.

Watch your child and enforce rules, such as no flips, somersaults, or rough play.

Trust your instincts. You know when something just isn't right. Look at the way the bounce house is secured to the ground, weather conditions, and the professionalism of the staff. If the house doesn't seem secure, it's windy or raining, or the staff doesn't seem to have control of the kids jumping, then trust your instinct and find another activity.

More tips to safely use inflatable bounce houses can be found here.

 

More Actions

Let “Splish and Splash” help your young children with pool safety

End Injury

The Adventures of Splish and Splash” is both a cartoon your children can watch and a game they can play to learn how to be safe around water. Splash is a dog who looks before he leaps; Splish is a cat who tries to keep Splash from getting hurt.

Should Splash go get the ball in the pool by himself, or should he wait for an adult to help him? What does your child think?

 

More Actions

Complete a backyard safety checklist

End Injury

As you and your family start spending more time outside of the house, make sure outside is as safe as possible with this sheet. Are your garbage cans securely covered? Do your light bulbs outdoors need changing?


Your children can – and probably should – help out with some of the items on the list. They may be able to tell you what parts of their swing sets need to be touched up, and you can tell them to clear their toys out of the walkways.

 

More Actions

Organize a safe family bike ride

End Injury

When was the last time you checked that your family’s bicycle helmets fit, or that all the bike tires were inflated to the right pressure? Children like to outgrow things during the winter, and air is notorious for escaping from tires. Plan a fun ride, and ask your children to help make sure everything still checks out before you go. Are the brakes still braking? Is the seat high enough? Use this quick guide to properly fit a helmet, and always follow manufacturers’ guidelines on correct tire pressure.

 

More Actions

Look cool mowing – get some fashionable safety glasses

End Injury

This time of year, you and your older children may be going to war with your yard. Do you have the right armor? Hundreds of children have eye and face injuries every year while mowing. Experts say that anyone using a lawn mower, child or adult, needs to wear polycarbonate protective glasses. They’re don’t all look like the chunky goggles from shop class – some look pretty sleek. Your children may even want to wear them.

If your children are helping with mowing, remember that a child needs to be at least 12 years old before operating any kind of mower, and must be 16 years old before using a riding mower. Along with eye protection, anyone mowing needs to wear hearing protection and sturdy shoes instead of sandals or flip-flops.

 

More Actions

Play home designer: move your furniture away from your windows

End Injury

Have you always meant to give the rooms in your home a fresh look? Well, there’s a serious reason to move your furniture around -- about 14 children per day go to a hospital emergency department after falling out of a window. Many of those children are able to reach windows by climbing on furniture.

The weather is warming up, and folks are starting to air out their homes after the long winter. So this is a great time to reorganize your rooms. Get your children in on the action, too. Talk to them about why you're moving the furniture, and see if they have any ideas about how to rearrange it. 

More Actions