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Columbus, Ohio
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Filtering by Category: on special occasions

Make safety a habit all year long

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Little steps can add up to big impact. Taking a few minutes every week to think about safety is a habit worth creating.

 

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Make your kid shine

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More kids are hit by cars on Halloween than any other day of the year, so make them shine! Add glow-in-the-dark or reflective tape (often found in the bicycle aisle or hardware section) to your kids' costumes so that drivers can see your little witches,  goblins, and vampires. Glow necklaces and flashlights are also good choices to help your kids stand out at night.

More information about Halloween safety here.

 

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Jump with joy! Stay safe in inflatable bouncers

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Your child may be tugging at your hand, pulling you towards the bounce house at your local festival or fair or even in your neighbor's back yard, but do a little safety check before taking off her shoes and letting her bounce to her heart's delight:

Only let your child jump alone or with children of her own size and age.

Watch your child and enforce rules, such as no flips, somersaults, or rough play.

Trust your instincts. You know when something just isn't right. Look at the way the bounce house is secured to the ground, weather conditions, and the professionalism of the staff. If the house doesn't seem secure, it's windy or raining, or the staff doesn't seem to have control of the kids jumping, then trust your instinct and find another activity.

More tips to safely use inflatable bounce houses can be found here.

 

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Celebrate July 4 with glow sticks instead of backyard fireworks

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There is no safe way to use backyard fireworks. Even sparklers, considered “safe” by some people, burn as hot as 2000 degrees. That’s a temperature that can melt metal and set clothes on fire. About 25 percent of the people injured by backyard fireworks every year are bystanders. A child only has to watch an adult using fireworks to be hurt.

 

What to do? Well, even young children can have fun with glow sticks. They’re available at most toy and party supply stores, and they are pretty inexpensive. Best of all, they can look like sparklers without burning like sparklers.      

 

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Honor their lives and protect yours

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It’s Memorial Day, the unofficial beginning of summer. Community pools open, families fire up their grills. If this is your family’s unofficial start of summer too, take a few minutes to review these tips on safe grilling, safe summer travel, and safe swimming. 

Memorial Day exists, though, to honor those members of the military who have died while serving the United States. You can try a number of safe activities with your children to teach them about why the day is important.

 

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Lock up your alcohol for prom

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And tell your teenagers that you have. Prom and graduation season can be hard on parents and teens. Teens are itching for more independence, and parents still want to keep their kids safe. Taking a concrete action like locking up the alcohol lets your children know where you stand on the issue and lets them know that you still care.

USA Today has some other ideas about how parents, students and schools can work together for a safe prom.

 

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“Keep it cool” when baking by letting kids decorate the holiday cookies

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Or the cakes and pies. The kitchen is a hot spot in more ways than one this time of year. All of the activity may tempt children to explore that room and this puts them at risk of burns, cuts, and other injuries. Give the kids a chance to help by icing or otherwise decorating baked goods once they are cool.

Some decorations, like hard candies and gum drops, are choking hazards for children 4 years of age and younger so avoid those with very young children. And continue to follow basic kitchen safety with children by keeping knives and other sharp items out of reach (preferably in latched drawers), using the back burners, turning pot handles toward the back of the stove, and keeping a 3 foot "no kids" zone around the oven.

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Beware of button batteries before you buy

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Button batteries look like coins (or candy) and power many toys and electronic devices. They are also very easy for children to swallow. Buy toys and devices with safety latches on battery compartments or other child-resistant features.

The batteries can become lodged in throats and intestines and release harmful chemicals. Learn more about button battery safety here

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Visiting the grandparents? Take a safety tour of the house first

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You may have tried to make your home safe, but what about the homes you visit for the holidays? This brochure can help show you what to look for. 

Grandparents and other adults often keep their medicine in easy reach and their household cleaners in unlocked cabinets. Ask if you can secure those items when you arrive. Be sure to put them back when you leave.

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Decorate your pumpkin

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Did you know that many Halloween-related injuries come from carving pumpkins? Replace the knives with brushes and non-toxic paint. Even young children can get involved and help decorate.

Check out our Pinterest page for examples of No-Carve pumpkins.

 

 

 

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Check Your Child's Costume

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Your goblin may look really scary in that mask, but can he see out of the eye holes? Is your princess going to trip on her long flowing gown? Will drivers be able to see your vampires on a dark road?

Some experts call dangerous Halloween costumes “Deadly Cute.”