contact us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right.


Columbus, Ohio
USA

More Actions

Filtering by Category: several hours

Install a working smoke detector in every bedroom

End Injury

It's simple: smoke detectors save lives. You probably have one installed near your stove and maybe in the hallway. But did you know you also should have a smoke detector in each bedroom or sleeping area? Having enough smoke detectors will give your family the best chance to get out of the house safely.

Click here for more information about where to place smoke detectors.

 

More Actions

Teach your kids emergency info with Sesame Street’s Let’s Get Ready app

End Injury

During an emergency, kids often get confused and scared. Sesame Street’s Let’s Get Ready app (iOS, Android) will help you show your kids how to handle an emergency. From learning full names to creating an emergency kit for the whole family, the app offers plenty of fun and age-appropriate tasks to get your family ready for the unexpected.

lets-get-ready-app-action-photo.png
 

More Actions

Find a certified car seat technician to check your child’s seat for safety

End Injury

Is someone else (like Grandma or Grandpa) your baby's designated driver? Trips to the store, day care, the park, and back home again may not seem like a big deal, but those miles add up. With many car seats installed incorrectly, it's important to get every car your child rides in checked for safety. Use this site to find a certified car seat technician near you, or call your local fire department to see if there's a technician on staff.

car-seat-tech-action-photo.png
 

More Actions

Celebrate July 4 with glow sticks instead of backyard fireworks

End Injury

There is no safe way to use backyard fireworks. Even sparklers, considered “safe” by some people, burn as hot as 2000 degrees. That’s a temperature that can melt metal and set clothes on fire. About 25 percent of the people injured by backyard fireworks every year are bystanders. A child only has to watch an adult using fireworks to be hurt.

 

What to do? Well, even young children can have fun with glow sticks. They’re available at most toy and party supply stores, and they are pretty inexpensive. Best of all, they can look like sparklers without burning like sparklers.      

 

More Actions

Pack for camp (or other summer adventures) with expert help

End Injury

We know that sunscreen needs to be in the duffel bag. But plenty of other items are important for your children to take along to summer camp – or just on the weekend cabin trip. The packing list and other tips here might be surprising.  

For example, did you know the kind of shoes your children wear make a big difference? Many camp injuries happen because of trips and falls, and the American Camp Association says that wearing closed-toe shoes instead of flip-flops may prevent those injuries.

 

More Actions

Organize a safe family bike ride

End Injury

When was the last time you checked that your family’s bicycle helmets fit, or that all the bike tires were inflated to the right pressure? Children like to outgrow things during the winter, and air is notorious for escaping from tires. Plan a fun ride, and ask your children to help make sure everything still checks out before you go. Are the brakes still braking? Is the seat high enough? Use this quick guide to properly fit a helmet, and always follow manufacturers’ guidelines on correct tire pressure.

 

More Actions

Look cool mowing – get some fashionable safety glasses

End Injury

This time of year, you and your older children may be going to war with your yard. Do you have the right armor? Hundreds of children have eye and face injuries every year while mowing. Experts say that anyone using a lawn mower, child or adult, needs to wear polycarbonate protective glasses. They’re don’t all look like the chunky goggles from shop class – some look pretty sleek. Your children may even want to wear them.

If your children are helping with mowing, remember that a child needs to be at least 12 years old before operating any kind of mower, and must be 16 years old before using a riding mower. Along with eye protection, anyone mowing needs to wear hearing protection and sturdy shoes instead of sandals or flip-flops.

 

More Actions

Lock up your alcohol for prom

End Injury

And tell your teenagers that you have. Prom and graduation season can be hard on parents and teens. Teens are itching for more independence, and parents still want to keep their kids safe. Taking a concrete action like locking up the alcohol lets your children know where you stand on the issue and lets them know that you still care.

USA Today has some other ideas about how parents, students and schools can work together for a safe prom.

 

More Actions

Play home designer: move your furniture away from your windows

End Injury

Have you always meant to give the rooms in your home a fresh look? Well, there’s a serious reason to move your furniture around -- about 14 children per day go to a hospital emergency department after falling out of a window. Many of those children are able to reach windows by climbing on furniture.

The weather is warming up, and folks are starting to air out their homes after the long winter. So this is a great time to reorganize your rooms. Get your children in on the action, too. Talk to them about why you're moving the furniture, and see if they have any ideas about how to rearrange it. 

More Actions

Map the smoke alarms in your home

End Injury

map-smoke-alarms-action-photo.png

This could take some time, so it will be our primary action for the next two weeks. It is important to know where your smoke detectors are. But based on what you learn about your smoke detectors, you may need to make changes in your home as well. The National Fire Protection Association says alarms should be inside each bedroom, outside each sleeping area, and on every level of the home, including the basement. The association also says you need two kinds of smoke detectors. Photoelectric smoke alarms are best at detecting smoldering fires, like ones started by lit cigarettes. Ionization alarms do better with flaming fires, like kitchen grease fires. And smoke detectors need to be replaced at least every 10 years. So spend the next couple of weeks on these steps:

  • Draw an outline of your home.
  • Go room by room, marking the location of your smoke detectors, the types of smoke detectors you have (photoelectric or ionization), and their expiration dates.
  • Do you need more smoke detectors, or new ones, or different kinds? Make plans to get what you need.
  • If you buy new smoke detectors, install them with these guidelines from the National Fire Protection Association.


For more information on smoke detectors, check out this video from the NFPA.

 

More Actions

Check your water temperature

End Injury

Water at 140° Fahrenheit can seriously burn an adult in just 5 seconds. It can burn a child even faster. Setting your water heater no higher than 120° can protect everyone in your home from burns, and you will still be able to take a hot shower.

Water heaters often do not show the correct water temperature. So to check the temperature for yourself, use a thermometer that shows high temperatures, like one for meat or candy. Turn on the hot water tap in your bathroom, and fill a cup with the hot water (so that you don’t burn yourself by trying to stick the thermometer under running water). If the temperature is higher than 120°, follow the water heater owner’s manual (available online) to turn the temperature down. That will mean calling in a professional in some cases. But to prevent a burn, it’s worth it.

water-temperature-action-photo.png