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Columbus, Ohio
USA

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Filtering by Category: traveling

Make safety a habit all year long

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Little steps can add up to big impact. Taking a few minutes every week to think about safety is a habit worth creating.

 

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Take off your child's coat BEFORE buckling them into a car safety seat.

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Cold weather has set in across the country, which means coats and snowsuits for everyone. All that extra padding, though, makes your child's car seat a little less effective, so take off your child's coat before buckling him up.

(Wondering why this matters or whether your child will be cold? Start with this story from today.com.)

 

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Take the Lock Your Meds® Pledge

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Most parents of young children know to keep medications up, away, and out of sight, but what about the parents of teenagers? In some cases, teens aren’t looking to drugs like marijuana to get high—they’re looking in their parents’ or grandparents’ medicine cabinet. Research shows that the number of teens who abuse prescription medication continues to rise. Take the Lock Your Meds® Pledge and secure the medications in your home.

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Find a certified car seat technician to check your child’s seat for safety

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Is someone else (like Grandma or Grandpa) your baby's designated driver? Trips to the store, day care, the park, and back home again may not seem like a big deal, but those miles add up. With many car seats installed incorrectly, it's important to get every car your child rides in checked for safety. Use this site to find a certified car seat technician near you, or call your local fire department to see if there's a technician on staff.

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Learn and enforce your state’s graduated driver’s license laws

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Many states made changes to graduated driver's licensing laws in the past few months. Stay up-to-date on the rules your teen must follow to stay safe--and legal--on the road. Click here for a complete list of state laws on graduated driver's licensing.

Once you know the law in your state, enforcement is the next step. Talk to your teen about why the laws are important, and have your teen sign a driving agreement (such as this one from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) that lays out rules, expectations, and consequences.

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Don’t sweat it. Drink plenty of water when out in the heat.

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It might seem simple, but getting enough to drink can make a huge difference in the health of your child, especially in the long, hot days of summer. Drinking plenty of water helps prevent muscle cramps, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke. Also, kids can’t handle heat as well as adults can, so it’s really important that kids drink water before, during, and after sports and recreational play. Click here for a handy infographic from Safe Kids Worldwide showing you how much your child should be drinking.

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Be a cool parent: don’t leave the kids in the car

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You stop at the store for a quick trip inside, and the question pops into your head: “Should I take the kids in or just leave them out here in the car?”

As this video demonstrates, it doesn’t take long for your car to heat up like an oven, even on colder or cloudy days. And kids are more sensitive to heat because their skin is thinner than ours, so they start getting sick from the heat much faster than adults.

Yes, it will take some extra time, but be a cool parent and take the kids with you, even if it’s just a quick trip inside.

 

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Pack for camp (or other summer adventures) with expert help

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We know that sunscreen needs to be in the duffel bag. But plenty of other items are important for your children to take along to summer camp – or just on the weekend cabin trip. The packing list and other tips here might be surprising.  

For example, did you know the kind of shoes your children wear make a big difference? Many camp injuries happen because of trips and falls, and the American Camp Association says that wearing closed-toe shoes instead of flip-flops may prevent those injuries.

 

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Put sunscreen on your shopping list

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You need it if you are going outside, and everyone else in your family does too. This handy flyer shows you exactly what to look for on a bottle, how much sunscreen you need to use, and why you need to use it.


Another reason to put sunscreen on your list: sunscreen expires after 3 years or so. If you are like a lot of people, you have some old bottles sitting around. It may be a good idea to start fresh.  

 

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Visiting the grandparents? Take a safety tour of the house first

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You may have tried to make your home safe, but what about the homes you visit for the holidays? This brochure can help show you what to look for. 

Grandparents and other adults often keep their medicine in easy reach and their household cleaners in unlocked cabinets. Ask if you can secure those items when you arrive. Be sure to put them back when you leave.

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Complete a cold weather vehicle checklist

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The holiday travel season is coming. This tip sheet and checklist will help you see if you’re ready.  Do you have an ice scraper in your car? Blankets in case you get stranded? Are your tires at the correct pressure?

Winter weather can bring dangerous driving conditions, but many people don’t think about that until it’s too late. Prepare now to help make your travels a little safer. 

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Check the expiration dates on your EpiPens

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Children who are allergic to insect bites and stings should always have an EpiPen nearby – especially outside. The pens usually expire about a year after you buy them.

“EpiPen” is the most well-known brand of self-shot that helps people with the allergic reactions, but the shots also go by the names Adrenaclick, Auvi-Q, and Epinephrine Injection. All of them can expire, and parents don’t always realize that until it is too late. 

 

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